Wednesday, January 8, 2014

The Little Book of Thin

I’ve been reading Lauren’s Foodtrainers blog for years, and when she announced that she was writing a book I was excited. Lauren is the founder of a New York City nutrition practice, and I really enjoy reading her blog, which covers nutrition as well as other topics.

Her brand-new book, The Little Book of Thin, was just released and when the opportunity arose to review the book I jumped at it. The book did not disappoint - from the look and feel of it to all the countless weight loss and maintenance tips and strategies, I enjoyed them all.

LittleBookofThin

I love that the book is truly a “little” book and that it is filled with useful information without any extra “fluff.”

Lauren starts off by pointing out that it often isn’t lack of nutrition knowledge that keeps us from being thin. She states, “we know what to eat until life gets in the way” (x). Her solution is one I wholeheartedly agree with and that I have been using myself: planning and anticipating food obstacles.

The book starts off with 10 steps to svelte where she suggests for example eating a protein breakfast within two hours of waking up, enjoying one fruit daily – but no more, limiting grains, carbs, and starchy vegetables to once a day, and doing “dunch” (eating a bigger lunch than dinner).

After explaining the rational behind each of her ten steps, Lauren provides a checklist that lets you evaluate where you fall short on the list.

Next Lauren dishes out some tough love and says there are three No’s on her plan: no negotiation, no excuses, and no exceptions. She has a list of foods she never wants us to eat or drink, such as soda, “diet” food, and gum.

But rather than focusing on the No’s, there is a much bigger section on what you can eat and a convenient “LBT Cheat Sheet” that lists all the foods that are allowed. There are “regular” foods that are grouped into protein, carbs, vegetables, fruit, seeds, nuts, and healthy fats, salad accessories, condiments and flavorings, and beverages. Lauren also has convenient visuals for portion sizes, such a lipstick tube or less for cheese (something I have to remember!).

Lauren is big on planning and suggests spending some time on Sundays to plan, purchase and prep meals, something I have been doing for years and know works. To make things simple, she has a list of five easy breakfasts, lunches, and dinners that you can easily put into a meal plan. At the end of the book, there is a recipe section.

Next she gives many useful tips on how to deal with the “witching hour,” some time in the late afternoon when many of us tend to overeat. Again, it comes back to planning. Lauren also has a “pre-snacktual agreement” that she wants you to fill out – a great idea as you agree what to eat when you get hungry ahead of time. Again, it comes back to being prepared.

Another important section of the book is treat training. It’s not realistic to never have a treat, but treats can easily get out of hand, and Lauren has some good strategies – once again it comes back to planning and being prepared.

The book covers pretty much all imaginable food scenarios from kids’ birthday parties (no reason to eat the pizza and cake!) to dating to eating out to holidays and gives the reader practical tips for each situation.

One of Lauren’s strategies that I really like is to not “over-accessorize” your salad (as I tend to over-accessorize mine once in a while…). That is, you get to choose only one of the following: avocado, cheese, nuts, seeds, olives, dried cranberries, raisins, or bacon. If you think about it, it’s really not necessary to have more than one of them at a time…

The last part of the book contains simple recipes from anything from quinoa to kale salad to how to boil perfect eggs (it’s the way I do it too) to date-night salmon. I haven’t tried any of the recipes yet, but they sound good and easy to make.

I really enjoyed reading the book and picked up several things I’ll incorporate into my life, such as some detox teas and herbs she suggests, the “not-over-accessorizing rule,” and keeping a closer eye on my carbs and fruits. I’ll also try some of her recipes soon.

I think The Little Book of Thin is a great book for anybody looking to lose some weight as it gives no-nonsense advice that includes planning, strategizing and having firm rules. That’s certainly what worked for me in the past when I lost weight. In addition, I love that it’s a small book that is packed with information, including a section on how to lose weight quickly in special situations, like before a vacation.  If you are looking to lose some weight or fine-tune things a bit, you'll find many useful strategies and tips in The Little Book of Thin. You can order a copy of The Little Book of Thin here.

Questions: Do you have any “treat rules?” If so, what are they? Do you plan meals, snacks, and treats? Why or why not? Share any tips!
 
Be well,
Andrea

[Disclaimer: I received a free review copy of The Little Book of Thin. All opinions in this review are my own.]

24 comments:

  1. Great post Andrea. And even though it's a little book my hope is that everyone selects their tweakable areas. Your salad and cheese (love cheese too) is someone elses travel or socializing. Love your posts and I know our "planning" emphasis overlaps a lot- amazing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we all have our tweakable areas! I really could relate to the planning as it has made such a big difference for me!

      Delete
  2. Great review, Andrea. I've added the book to my (very long) "to read" list.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great review, Andrea! I, too, enjoy Lauren's blog and her new book is very exciting! I love it when there are straightforward tips without the fluff. I'll have to remember the part about not "over accessorizing" salads (which I do all the time, too!). Planning is key! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's so easy to "over accessorize!" :) And, yes, planning is so important!

      Delete
  4. You are the meal planning maven Andrea!!!! Not surprised that tip stood out. Have a wonderful day, and Lauren, looks like a great book!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Andrea, This is one of the best book reviews I've read for a long time. And I trust your judgment too. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  6. My treats = eating a delicious piece of salmon, so I don't really have "rules" - ha ha ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If we all ate like you do, we wouldn't need "rules!" :)

      Delete
  7. I loved this book! I agree that plannin for food obstacles is key! It really is something I focus on with all my patients.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, so many great tips throughout the book!

      Delete
  8. Yep, planning is key! The whole week my husband was in the hospital, I still worked my day job and I relied on hospital food - not the best quality! And, um, I may over accessorize my salad a bit too! :D Loved the review Andrea!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's easy to over accessorize your salads... After reading the book, I'm much more aware! :)

      Delete
  9. I regularly over accessorize my salads. I'm not crazy about veggies and it's one of the ways I actually enjoy salads. It works for me. Planning is soooo important. I should do more of it! :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true, you have to do what works for you! And, yes, I don't think you can over-plan! :)

      Delete
  10. Thank you for the review Andrea. I do think success boils down to plan, plan and plan! I have my own food rules that work for me. Always sit down to eat and eat only off a plate or out of a bowl. This helps with mindless munching for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great rules to avoid mindless munching, Tami!

      Delete
  11. Congratulations to Lauren’s brand new book release! Thank you for the detailed review on her book, I like a small book, too, and also reading checklists, cheat sheet, steps and useful tips! I like the tip, “don’t over-accessorize your salad”, I used to do that with so many ingredients because way back then I feel that a salad doesn’t have enough, but with the right and flavorful dressing/sauce, you don’t need too many ingredients to make a big salad!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, a flavorful dressing makes a big difference!

      Delete
  12. I do have treat rules. I have two boys - 7 and 18 months. I'm 43, and I haven't been able to eat whatever I want for years - and I'm still trying to get 25-30 pounds of that second pregnancy weight off.

    I attend a lot of kids birthday parties, and I stay away from the pizza and cake too. I try to eat before I go. My other treat rules are: keep them treats - no more than once a week. Preferably less often. And: make them really TREATS. I love good chocolate. Or a brownie or chocolate chip cookie. But...I don't really like cake, or pie, or anything like that. So, I don't waste the calories on something that I don't REALLY want. Because if I do - well then, it gets so much easier to lower the bar for what I'll eat.

    I have to disagree on the salad. I prefer not to limit my treats on a salad. I like cheese AND nuts and avocado too if I have it. But often my salad IS the main dish NOT the side dish. And I measure out the cheese/ nuts/ avo.

    Just found your site through Biz. Really enjoying it. I like your exercise and eating philosophy too - matches mine pretty well, maybe something about getting older and living in California. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting point about the salad. I certainly often have more than one "accessory" on my salad. And, as you point out, it's different if its your main course. However, I liked the reminder that it's really easy to go overboard with "accessories" and many of them are quite high in calories. Instead of bulking my salad up with avocado/nuts/cheese, etc., I started adding roasted veggies and some chicken or fish to mine. Just as satisfying but better for you.

      Delete