Sunday, April 8, 2012

Japchae: Korean Noodles (Korean Banchan Series)

Japchae is often served as part of the side dishes in Korean restaurants. However, it can also be a meal all of its own when it is served on a bed of rice and is then called japchae bap.

Most japchae recipe include meat, but since we don’t eat very much meat these days, I usually make it without meat. Also, I always change the ingredients in this dish, as I use whatever vegetables I have around.



Japchae (Korean Noodles)

Ingredients (for the noodles)
  • 8 ounces glass noodles (also called sweat potato or mung bean noodles)
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • Olive oil
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • 8 ounces oyster mushrooms, sliced
  • 8 ounces spinach (blanch the spinach and squeeze it dry)
  • oil
Ingredients (for the sauce)
  • 2 tsp toasted sesame seeds
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbps black pepper
  • 1/2 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
Directions
  1. Cook the noodles according to the directions on the package, between 6 – 8 minutes.
  2. Rinse the noodles with cold water. If they are the long kind, cut them into about 5-inch-long pieces.
  3. Pour two tablespoons soy sauce over the noodles and make sure all noodles are coated evenly.
  4. Heat a frying pan and lightly coat it with oil.
  5. Stir fry the noodles for 4-5 minutes.
  6. Set the noodles aside.
  7. Mix the ingredients for the sauce and set aside.
  8. Heat a frying pan, add a little oil, and stir fry the vegetables one by one and let them cool. Season each vegetable with a little salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  9. Once the vegetables are cooled, combine them with the spinach and the noodles.
  10. Coat the noodles with the sauce.
  11. Often this dish is served with egg strips. To make the egg strips, make an “egg pancake” and cut it into thin strips.
Of course it’s a lot more fun to make this dish if you have a helper:

Some of the noodles are REALLY long… In the picture on the right, they have already been cut and are being sautéed.

Once all ingredients are at room temperature, they can be mixed together.


Questions: What’s your favorite noodle dish?  
Be well,
Andrea

32 comments:

  1. oh another favorite. I love the little helper who looks like he has great knife skills. He has good technique.

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  2. I am seriously drooling reading this. These noodles look just amazing!
    Hope you had a Happy Easter!

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    1. Thanks! We had a very nice Easter.

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  3. Looks good! Right now I am really into soba noodles, served hot in broth. I thought of you the other day because Ryan had Korean food for the first time (at the airport in Tokyo!) and when he told me I asked him if he tried the bibimbap (yeah, I just double checked the spelling on that!) and he said yes, and asked how I knew. It was my best guess! He said it was awesome.

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    1. Love soba noodles in broth. So comforting... And, yes, bibimbap is one of our favorites! :)

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  4. Look at how big the toddler is getting!! I feel like I haven't seen pictures or videos of him in a while...and now he's using a knife and cutting veggies! I'm assuming the knife wasn't sharp, but still, WOW! Maybe you've got a future chef on your hands?!

    This dish sounds wonderful. There is something about sesame and noodles that makes my mouth water. It's just such a wonderful combination. And of course veggies add great taste too!

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    1. Yes, the knife wasn't sharp. :) I try to involve him whenever I can in the kitchen, and he loves it. My older son loved to help in the kitchen, too, and even took a culinary arts class in high school. He cooks well, but I think he is a bit lazy these days...

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  5. oh how fun- I love seeing the prepping photos! this looks great!

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  6. I love noodle dishes! This one looks really good. I like how bright the final product is. Yum!

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  7. I'm not that into noodles, but my husband loves pad thai.

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    1. I haven't had pad thai in ages. May have to get some...

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  8. This looks excellent Andrea. And LOVE the photo of your little sous chef helping out!!! Have a wonderful week.

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  9. I love ANY type of noodle dish - especially if its spicy! :D

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    1. Yes, spicy dishes are the best! :)

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  10. Wow your son is helping you slice the vegetables? Impressive! I love jap chae, it's so simple, delicious and makes great leftovers!

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    1. Yes, the knife isn't sharp though! :) And, yes, japchae makes great leftovers!

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  11. Oh, I love chap chae<<I've always spelled it this way, but it sounds the same phonetically. We have a Chinese/Korean restaurant that makes it extremely well. We've probably ordered it over 50 times in the past decade. Btw, son is adorable.

    :-) Marion

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    1. It seems it's spelled either way (and I think I actually go back and forth...).

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  12. I think it's really cool that you're into cooking and eating a lot of Korean foods. Growing up, my mom was almost more into Chinese cooking than my dad was, and it was just a nice feeling to have both parents be in touch with that part of my culture :)

    Right now my favorite noodle food would be noodle soup. I have a cold and noodle sounds like perfection.

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    1. It's funny because there are quite a few Korean dishes (especially seafood dishes) that Andy never touched until I started to eat and cook them...

      Noodle soup sounds perfect for a cold! Hope you'll feel better soon!

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  13. Andrea, I love this noodles, especially the slightly chewy texture...looks delicious.
    Hope you are having a great week :)

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    1. Thanks! Hope you are having a great week, too!

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  14. I have never had oyster mushrooms...so sad! They are so fun-looking and I've heard they're wooonderful. Definitely on my bucket list!

    My favorite noodle dish is Pad Thai, but I have this beet pasta recipe that I can't get off the brain!

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    1. A beet pasta dish sounds fabulous!

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  15. So many comments. First, your son with the knife, impressive skills. Second, can you use other, less long, noodles? Like Nicole I adore Pad Thai but I think we'll see more rice/alternative pasta noodles as others want to be healthy and like you eat less meat.

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    1. I believe traditionally the noodles are very long, but there are some brands that make shorter noddles (the length of spaghetti). It's certainly nice not to have to wrestle with the noodles... :)

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  16. This looks great! I would like to learn more about Asian noodles. I don't eat noodles often because I always associate them with grain flour (like Italian pasta) but it sounds like Asian noodles might be different.

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    1. Korean glass noodles are usually made with sweet potato starch. I'm actually not sure how they affect your body (but it's definitely something worth looking into more...). I stay away from glass noodles made in China as some brands have been found to be contaminated with various substances over the years.

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